10-year-old creates lemonade empire to fight child slavery

By Neal McNamara | April 1, 2014
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How many 10-year-olds do you know who have raised over $100,000 to fight childhood slavery by selling lemonade?

There may be just one – Vivienne Harr, of Fairfax, Calif., who spoke to host David Boze Tuesday about her crusade to end childhood slavery, and how that has catapulted her to become an author, a phone app maker, and star of a new documentary.

LISTEN: DAVID BOZE TALKS TO CHILD SLAVERY FIGHTER VIVIENNE HARR

Harr was inspired to fight slavery after seeing a photo of two Nepalese boys enslaved as laborers. The photo reminded Harr of her and her little brother.

“It just broke my heart,” Harr told Boze. “I think of him and me being slaves and it just breaks my heart.”

So, like most kids looking to make some money, Harr began selling lemonade for $2 a cup with the goal of raising $100,000. Realizing that it would take “1 million years” to reach her goal, she turned the lemonade stand into a charity, asking people to pay what’s in their heart.

“I wanted to free 500 children from slavery, which would cost $100,000,” she said. “We set up our stand, and we made a stand for 173 days, and we reached our goal in Times Square. So I said, ‘Is child slavery done, did we do it?’ My mother said, ‘No, there’s still a far way to go.’ So I kept going.”

In fact, with the help of her father, Eric Harr, Vivienne began bottling her lemonade. The organic, fair-trade Make a Stand Lemon-Aid is selling briskly.

“Your dad must be quite a fellow if he’s willing to help you out,” Boze said.

“Yeah, he’s a great dad, and I love him so much,” Harr said.

Now, Harr is out with a new book, which she wrote with her mother and father. “Make a Stand” is a children’s book about “how big things have small beginnings.”

In addition to the book, Harr is rolling out a smartphone app called Clickstand that you can use it to photograph a charitable cause to raise money or awareness. And, a documentary about Harr, “#Standwithme,” is debuting in Seattle on April 5.

The proceeds of Harr’s little lemonade empire go to seven charities dealing with child slavery, including UNICEF, the Nepalese Foundation, Not For Sale, the International Justice Mission, and Free the Slaves.

“How do you keep from getting tired or discouraged?” Boze asked.

“My friend [Stephanie, an adult] does all the bad parts, and I do all the good parts like selling lemonade. She doesn’t want me to get scared and depressed.”

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