Kids pick Limbaugh as best children’s book author

By Neal McNamara | May 16, 2014
Rush children's choice award

It appears KTTH host Rush Limbaugh is now in the company of Maurice Sendak, Dr. Seuss, E.B. White, and Roald Dahl.

On Wednesday, the Children’s Book Council named Limbaugh “author of the year” for his tween books about American history, “Rush Limbaugh and the Brave Pilgrims,” and “Rush Revere and the First Patriots.”

The books star Rush Revere and his horse, Liberty, who help kids travel back in time so they can experience monumental American historical events.

The amazing thing about the Children’s Book Council awards, Limbaugh said, is that it’s the readers who choose the best. So, essentially, the kids chose Rush as their favorite.

“When they announced my name I was momentarily frozen,” Limbaugh said of the experience.

Limbaugh beat out other popular – and non-historical – books like “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Hard Luck” by Jeff Kinney, “The House of Hades” by Rick Riordan, and “Allegiant” by Veronica Roth.

“This is unexpected, but it’s a thrill. On behalf of Rush Revere and his talking horse Liberty, time-traveling, I want to thank all the children who voted and who’ve read the books,” Limbaugh said in his acceptance speech. “I love America. I wish everybody did. I hope everybody will. It’s one of the most fascinating stories of human history, this country and what it has meant to the world and what it means to the citizens who live here. And it’s a delight and it’s an opportunity to try to share that story with young people so that they can grow and learn to love and appreciate the country in which they’re growing up and will someday run and lead and inherit.”

Watch the full video of Rush’s acceptance speech here. 

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