Supreme Court rules some corporations can opt out of covering contraceptives

By Stephanie Klein | June 30, 2014
AP AP

Michael Hichborn kneels and prays as he joins demonstrators while waiting for the Supreme Court’s decision on the Hobby Lobby case outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 30, 2014.

By Ben Shapiro

In a very tightly defined ruling, the Supreme Court has ruled that Hobby Lobby and other closely held for-profit corporations may opt out of the Obamacare’s provisions for no-cost prescription contraception in most health insurance plans. The companies’ owners had objected on the grounds of religious freedom. The Court went out of its way to make sure this a very narrow ruling, making clear that this ruling only applies to closely held corporations, the Obamacare contraceptive rules, and not to coverage such as blood transfusions and immunizations, which is a common argument by those who object to the Hobby Lobby case.

Justice Samuel Alito wrote the majority opinion which was concurred with by Justices Scalia, Thomas, Roberts, and Kennedy, which contends that closely held corporations (stock not traded owned by a few people) are entitled to their religious beliefs but other less restrictive methods of granting contraceptives could have been developed by HHS and congress. For example the government is already paying for the coverage for not for profit religious organizations. The majority opinion says the government can make the same accommodations for closely held corporations such as Hobby Lobby.

Read more at Truth Revolt

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