9 reasons to ban gun free zones

By Neal McNamara | July 10, 2014
Gun Rights Lawsuit

Tara Cowan of Euless, Texas, a member of Open Carry Tarrant County, poses with a Saiga 556 rifle as she and members of the group Open Carry Tarrant County gathered for a demonstration on May 29 (AP).

Tragically, high profile shootings at colleges, schools, churches, malls, and more have seemingly become common in America (but they’re not increasing), largely due to media inflation. Rightfully, the public wants a solution to these shootings, with some calling for more “gun free zones.” The problem is, these zones are actually a threat to public safety because they actually encourage shootings. Here are the top reasons we should ban gun free zones:

They Stop Nothing: It’s just that simple. A person with a gun and an urge to kill is not going to give up on his goal of mass murder because there’s a sign that says that guns are not allowed.

They Allow Nothing: Gun free zones also keep out the good people – that is, the responsible gun owners who carry their weapons for self defense. If you have a murderer storming through a school shooting people, would it really hurt to have a good guy there with a gun? A ban on gun free zones makes people safer.

They Create Soft Targets: Every time you create a gun free zone, you’re creating a target, be it for terrorists, lunatics, or anyone else bent on death and destruction.

They Discourage Gun Ownership: Gun free zones make it appear that owning a gun is somehow wrong or weird or inherently deadly. That sends the message to people who would otherwise consider owning a gun that society will shun them, like cigarette smokers or Mets fans.

They Discourage Gun Safety: If you’re uncomfortable or unknowledgeable about guns, being around them more can help. Just like if you’re afraid or dogs or heights, exposing yourself to those things can help. When you ban gun free zones, you allow people to witness what safe, responsible gun ownership looks like.

They Help Murderers Choose Targets: A sign warning people that “guns are not allowed” or “this is a gun free zone” in a certain place are basically advertisements beckoning mass murderers. Santa Barbara shooter Elliot Rodger avoided shooting up a popular campus party because he observed too many police (with guns) in attendance.

They Penalize Lawful Citizens: What if you unwittingly wander into a gun free zone and authorities catch you? You could end up in losing your gun, or, worse, end up in jail. A ban on gun free zones keeps law-abiding citizens out of jail

They Create a False Sense of Security: For a number of reasons, there are people out there who are afraid of or just don’t like guns. When these people – and people who don’t have an opinion either way on guns – see a sign for a gun free zone, it makes them feel safe. A false sense of security can dull alertness, creating an opening for mass killers.

They Correlate With Gun Deaths: Every single shooting since 1950 where three or more people died occurred in a gun free zone (with the exception of the 2011 shooting in Tucson of Gabrielle Giffords). Why propagate a policy that coincides 99 percent of the time with death? A ban on gun free zones will immediately decrease crime.

They Don’t Ban Other Weapons: You don’t allow guns, but you allow, say, knives or bombs? There are documented instances where multiple people have been slaughtered by people who aren’t carrying guns. A gun isn’t the only way to commit mass murder, but a gun is one of the only ways to stop mass murder.

More Guns, Less Crime: Go ahead, take a look at crime rates in parts of the country where gun ownership is high. Notice anything? Yes, incredibly low rates of violent and property crime. Guns deter criminals, gun free zones do not.

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